By now you’ve probably heard that James Arthur Ray was found guilty of three counts of negligent homicide. He was found not guilty of manslaughter, which reflects intent. Instead, he’s essentially guilty of basic stupidity: he should have know better. And because he should have, and didn’t do anything to prevent three deaths. He will be sentenced on Tuesday.

Below is a video from Youtube of the reading of the jury’s findings.

I found myself watching JAR, trying to look inside his person. I found myself feeling his hopes and anxieties, or at least what I perceived to be his emotional landscape. At one point, when the first guilty finding is read, I found myself feeling sorry for the man. And then I reminded myself that three people (in this episode) died in his care.

There are two main money drivers in life. Fear. And greed. Our entire economy, which is governed by the stock market, is based on these fundamental drivers. I think that we as human beings are all guilty of being motivated by both. Fear of death is often the final motivator when it comes to weight-loss or quitting smoking. And greed is the want for more. More money, more toys, more leisure.

When they are not taxed at their extreme ends, both can be as good as they are evil. They make us seek a living above the poverty line, they make us seek promotions, and a better life for our children.

James Arthur Ray successfully leveraged other people’s greed. He’s NOT alone in the business, but he is (unfortunately for him) alone in the spotlight. I’m willing to bet that the higher-ups (Anthony Robbins, Bob Proctor, T. Harv Eker and the like) are paying attention. Ray is taking the fall so that the others can modify their firewalks and arrow-tip exercises so that safety becomes the number one priority.

And I hope that everyone else casting judgement on the consumer first look deep inside and see that that the same drivers, for better or worse, lurk within us all.

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This entry was posted on Thursday, June 23rd, 2011 at 4:05 pm and is filed under On James Arthur Ray, On Wealth Seminars. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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